Look. Love. Vote. Akron Art Prize returns for 5th year

Summit Artspace

Summit Artspace during opening weekend of Akron Art Prize 2015

With a combined prize amount of $16,000, new and expanded categories, juror prizes, and art works within one single gallery, the 2016 Akron Art Prize is poised to be a great experience.

Akron Art Prize logo NEW 2016Art Prize, sponsored by the Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation and coordinated by Downtown Akron Partnership, takes place at Summit Artspace from Sept. 3-Oct. 1. View more than 200 works of art ranging from photography, sculpture, graphic design, paintings and more with public vote determining $12,000 in cash prizes in six categories. In addition, two civic jurors and two arts jurors will award $1,000 each to four entries.

Entries are accessible for viewing and voting Thursdays-Saturdays from 12 to 9 p.m. throughout the month.

Come to opening night
Saturday, September 3, 5-10 p.m.
Enjoy music by The Dreemers, food trucks and cash bar from 5-9 p.m.

Come to closing night
Saturday, October 1, 12-9 p.m.Vote for entries at Summit Artspace until 8 p.m. and then make your way to the Akron Art Museum for the finale reception from 8-10 p.m. with entertainment by DJ Ben Crazy,  light hors d’oeuvres and cash bar.

Voting
Download the FREE Akron Art Prize app through iTunes or Google Play to view entries, curate favorites and cast votes. Each registered voter, age 16 and older, has up to five votes.

Visit akronartprize.org or facebook.com/akronartprize for details. Share Art Prize experiences on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook using #akronartprize16.

The Burton D. Morgan Foundation provides additional marketing support for Akron Art Prize and presents artists with opportunities for growth through networking, building rapport with galleries and providing tools to promote themselves to patrons.

Distinctly Downtown: Apotheclaire – An environmentally-friendly twist to beauty care

Walking into Apotheclaire is literally a breath of fresh air –the new eco-responsible salon in Downtown Akron makes natural, organic and chemically-reduced alternatives their priority.

Unlike most salons, Apotheclaire recycles 98 percent of their waste, such as color leftovers, vinyl gloves, product packaging and hair. Apotheclaire is part of the Green Circle Salons, which has warehouses that use recycled hair to make oil booms. The oil booms are used to clean up oil spills, and can be reused several times, unlike synthetic booms.

The idea of Apotheclaire began with owner Claire White, who has a long history of being hypersensitive to many chemicals and fragrances. The name Apotheclaire was inspired by the word “apothecary,” which in Latin means shopkeeper, creatively combined with Claire’s name.

“I don’t remember a time when I didn’t have some sort of rash or sneeze or actually be in the hospital,” White said. “It’s something I’ve had to deal with my entire life, and I’ve had to learn how to accommodate my personal environment for a long time.”

White told stories of the struggles she would go through when getting a haircut. The hair salons would have to make sure there were no chemical products lying around or any fragrances lingering in the air.

White said there are others like her; however, her main goal is to make sure that Apotheclaire provides the best service in the nicest environment possible, regardless of if a customer has the intention of being toxin-free.

“We try to keep the environment clean enough and comfortable enough that if you come in here for a service, you’re going to leave here feeling good,” White said.

In addition, Apotheclaire is also a retail shop that sells a variety of natural and organic beauty, skin, hair, personal and home care products.

One of White’s favorite products that she sells are wool dryer balls. These dryer balls are an eco-friendly alternative to dryer sheets and fabric softeners, which have harmful chemicals and perfumes that coat clothing. In contrast, the dryer balls have no chemicals and can be used over and over again.

White said the intention she has for Apotheclaire is to have a series of shops in one place. In addition to the services and products Apotheclaire already provides, Claire hopes that if there are opportunities for the salon to grow, she will be able to put them all under the same roof.

Apotheclaire is located on 70 E. Mill Street in Akron, on the ground floor of Greystone Hall. Salon hours are Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8 a.m., Wednesday and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information about Apotheclaire, visit their website at www.Apotheclaire.com and check out their Instagram account @Apotheclaire.

By: Zaina Salem
DAP communications intern

 

Rubber City Comics thrives at new location

Rubber City Comics is the place to go for any comic book fans, young or old.

Rubber City Comics began in a small room inside Quaker Square, where it was called “Quaker Square Comics.” There, the store sold comic books but also a conglomerate of kick-knacks such as souvenirs, T-shirts, candy and more.

Now at its new storefront in Downtown Akron, Rubber City Comics focuses on comics, graphic novels, action figures, apparel, and other collectables.

Rubber City Comics outside

Owner Scott Malensek said there are three things that make Rubber City Comics stand out from other comic book stores: the customers, the free subscription service, and the consignment.

“We’re defined largely by the people right around us. We let the customers help evolve us and develop,” Malensek said. “And that’s where we have our focus. We’re a reflection of our customers.”

Manager Tom Hoff said the subscription service is flexible enough so that if someone wanted to jump on or jump off, it’s a quick process.

Rubber City Comics attracts a variety of age groups –from young children to adults. For these people, the store is not just a place to buy comic books and leave; many come just to hang out and speak the language. The staff enjoys talking with customers and hanging out with people who like the same conversations and interests.

“This is a destination. It’s the kind of place where people come,” Hoff said. “We have built a community.”

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One unique thing that Rubber City Comics does is host a comic fan get-together on the last Saturday of every month. From 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., guests can watch a comic-related movie as well as discuss ideas.

If you’re a comic book fan, or are interested in becoming one, stop by at Rubber City Comics for a fun and unique experience! Their hours are Mondays through Wednesdays from noon to 6 p.m., Thursdays and Fridays from 1:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, check out their Facebook and Twitter.

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By: Zaina Salem
DAP intern

Distinctly Downtown: blue: a Goodwill Boutique

Who doesn’t like a good thrift find? Goodwill’s blue Boutique is brand new to Downtown Akron, opening just a few months ago in August, anDSC00898d is full of great finds at affordable prices. I stopped into the store to sit down and talk with Janet Morrison, Vice President of Contacts and Logistics and Dee Gillespie, Manager of blue Boutiques.

This lovely little boutique came straight from the minds of Akron students who missed having a Goodwill downtown. When the store closed in 2000, the students were given a project to bring Goodwill back. The final projects were presented to the student’s instructors and Goodwill and that’s how blue was born.

It took years oDSC00895f working with the idea to find great success before blue found the perfect location right on S. Main. But all the effort put into the project is evident as soon as you walk into the store. The urban feel makes it fit right into downtown and it’s easy to find exactly what you’re looking for.

You’re not going to be wearing what everyone else is; you’re going to find a “different look that’s not coming off the rack…very rare and very unique,” said Morrison.

Morrison also mentions that “blue is a great opportunity to reach those that don’t typically thrift,” or find larger thrift stores to be overwhelming. Gillespie, who comes from a family of Goodwill shoppers, says it helps break the stigma that only people of need shop at Goodwill.  But the smaller size doesn’t limit your options by any means. You can still stop in and find shoes, purses, cute tops, lots of denim, and there’s even clothing for men.DSC00896

While you’re busy filling your closet, don’t forget to clean it out too. Blue accepts donations and in fact, they encourage them. Goodwill had 21,000 tons donated just last year and blue works to make sure that not only is the boutique filled with great finds and fashion, but the retail stores as well. Gillespie says they’re all “one big happy family.”

Thrifting isn’t only great for your wallet, but it’s a great way to help others. Goodwill’s mission is to help people find and retain employment. Morrison wants people to know that every dollar that is spent at Goodwill is helping their mission. Goodwill wants to help others and they want to provide a place for everyone to shop, regardless of income. Goodwill is also part of the recycling movement, and that’s why Morrison and Gillespie believe that blue has been so successful. Morrison says millennials today have connected with the sustainability movement and want to reduce waste. So when you shop at blue you’re truly supporting so many good causes. And it’s also a great place to stop in and volunteer.

Morrison and Gillespie’s goal with blue is to strengthen the community and bring retail to downtown to help create employment and give back. If you’re looking for unique finds and great prices stop into blue boutique at either location (Akron or Kent), and for more information check out their website.

By: Brittany Norman
DAP intern

Distinctly Downtown: She’s A Smart Cookie

Shana Stiel, creator, owner, and sole-employee of She’s A Smart Cookie, a gluten-free and vegan treats business, brings healthy and tasty snacks to Northeast Ohio and Akron’s The Market at Lock 3.

Stiel’s certified home bakery is located in North Canton. She provides services primarily at farmers markets and to businesses and bakery shops in Cleveland, Akron, Kent, and other surrounding Ohio areas.

Stiel delivers special orders to cafes where her products are then featured. She’s A Smart Cookie is sold at several shops in Akron such as Highland Square’s Angel Falls Coffee and The Coffee Pot Cafe downtown.photo(12)

Stiel is very active in the downtown Akron dining life through her involvement at The Market at Lock 3 and her locations in Akron stores and bakeries.

Stiel makes various baked goods, health snacks, and energy bars; providing a wide range of gluten-free and vegan options that taste good and provide essential nutrients. Her specialties are cookies, granola, almond butter, and energy balls.

These products are not only completely vegan, but they are also packed with natural ingredients- with no fillers or artificial flavors. Her treats are both healthy and delicious.

“I want to make a cookie taste like a cookie—not like it’s trying to be a cookie,” Stiel said.

Stiel began her business after personally suffering from food allergies. For the past 4 years, Stiel struggled with countless health problems. She was lethargic, constantly tired, and had severe migraines and body pains. After seeing numerous doctors, none of whom could diagnose her, Stiel sought a solution through her diet.

Similarly, Stiel’s sister suffered from allergies to wheat and dairy, which encouraged Stiel to get testing done for food allergies. After getting the results back from her tests, Stiel learned that she was allergic to wheat, dairy, and gluten. This knowledge motivated Stiel to change her diet drastically. She already maintained a vegetarian diet and exercised regularly, but this inspired her to look for more ways to improve her lifestyle.

“No food tasted good enough for me to feel so bad,” Stiel reminisced about the first few weeks upon discovering her food allergies.

Over time Stiel adapted to a gluten-free and vegan lifestyle. She felt the results of her diet change immediately; quickly recognizing the improvement in her body and health.

Still, Stiel struggled while grocery shopping for foods. She found that most products in stores were loaded with gluten and artificial fillers. She always loved baking, so she took matters into her own hands and began testing ingredients to create more options that her sister (the sister with a sweet tooth) and she could enjoy.

As Stiel saw the changes and improvement in her life and diet, she wanted to share this with others, knowing that she couldn’t be alone in this issue with her allergies. Stiel hoped that if the awareness of gluten-free snacks that tasted good reached the public, more people might make the switch to wheat and dairy-free products.

Stiel is passionate about helping others with health problems, and she encourages those who struggle with aches and lethargy to get tested for allergies to food. Yet, Stiel also seeks out people without food allergies to still take a look at their diets and find room for improvement. Stiel said that if vegan products taste as good as regular products, people’s bodies might feel and look better eating the first choice.

Stiel’s advice to anyone hesitant to change their usual eating habits is that “you can eat smart, and it can taste great.”

While grocery stores primarily offer popular manufacturers’ brands, despite their unhealthiness, Stiel’s goal is to popularize not only She’s A Smart Cookie products, but gluten-free and vegan options in general.

“I think it’s getting to that point where people want to be healthy now,” said Stiel. Taking the initiative to put her product in numerous shops and bakeries, Stiel hopes people become familiarized with her vegan treats and make the transition over to a healthier diet.

Stiel’s business is continually growing; roughly every week, she starts selling to at least one more bakery in Ohio. Her goals are to one day see She’s A Smart Cookie as a trusted and recognized brand in bakeries and grocery stores everywhere.

By: Spencer Skolnick, Downtown Akron Partnership Intern

Distinctly Downtown: Cascade Plaza

Cascade Plaza, a new addition to Downtown Akron’s vibrant atmosphere, attracts employees and residents of the area for games, music and relaxation.

The Cascade Plaza

The Cascade Plaza

Developed recently this summer, Cascade Plaza, located along South Main Street, is a public spot many people frequent during their lunch hour, for the lively and beautiful environment it provides. The tables and open field give people an outdoor lunching area and a great escape from the office.

Downtown Akron Partnership (DAP) hosts Summer on the Plaza, a program that brings events, musicians, and games to the new downtown hotspot, attracting more people to the area.

As the summer intern with DAP, I get to experience Summer on the Plaza firsthand. Participating in “Throwback Thursday” each week, a day that brings old recess games back to people in downtown Akron and onto the plaza’s field, I’m able to watch partakers roll up the sleeves of their office suits and get down and dirty in competitive games of corn hole.

Playing a game of corn hole with the DAP staff

Playing a game of corn hole with the DAP staff

While every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. reminds participants of their past with games like bocce, ladder ball, and badminton, other days of the week attract people to the plaza as well.

Tuesdays during lunch break hours, free concerts take over the Cascade Plaza. Artists such as Ohio’s own Michael McFarland perform free shows at the plaza. For the remainder of the summer from 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m., Akron employees, residents and students are encouraged to enjoy their lunches on the plaza, entertained  by some rock ‘n’ roll.

Wednesdays welcome Namaste and downward dog with Yoga on the Plaza on evenings at 5:30 p.m. Akron Yoga & Wellness introduces free yoga classes, the perfect way to relax before heading home from work.

I highly suggest to anyone able to utilize the resources of these free events to take advantage of this summer fun. And for anyone unable to attend the Summer on the Plaza events, I still recommend enjoying the sunshine and the beautiful surroundings of the Cascade Plaza during your down time.

Summer on the Plaza occurs from now until September 3. Stop by to soak up the sun and free entertainment before the summer ends.

By Spencer Skolnick, Downtown Akron Partnership Intern

Distinctly Downtown: Tammy O’s Hair Salon

Tammy O’s Hair Salon exceeds typical salon and barber shop expectations and provides a sense of community to its customers, contributing to Downtown Akron life.

The Shoppestammy-o-for-constant-contact at Akron Centre offer a wide range of shopping and dining options. This shopping center adds to the lively, entertaining atmosphere of Downtown Akron. Well-known establishments such as Angel Falls Coffee, as well as original specialty shops like NOTO, are centered in this building, drawing in local workers and shoppers in the Akron area.

A place of its own—famous for its friendly employees and wide variety of offered salon and spa services, Tammy O’s, owned and operated by Tammy O’Strander, attracts men and women of all ages and ethnicities to the salon. The salon specializes in nails, massages, hair coloring and styling, as well as cuts and waxes, and cosmetology.

O’Strander is working in her fifteenth year at the franchise in the Shoppes at Akron Centre. She is a licensed barber, who started a career at this salon as an employee in her youth. She then took over the shop when the previous owner left and has run the salon ever since his departure. Although O’Strander began as a men’s barber, she expanded the salon to offer far more services, for both men and women.

O’Strander started in the business at a young age. She enjoyed cutting hair and considered it her hobby. She made the initiative to turn it into a career after working at a salon in Beachwood, Ohio, where her co-workers and employers taught her more than she imagined she could learn. O’Strander states that was when she fell in love with her hobby, and it developed into her career.

O’Strander took these life-changing lessons and applied them when she started running Tammy O’s Salon.

As the owner, O’Strander refuses to operate a cookie-cutter hair salon and spa; she wants both her employees and customers to get the most out of her knowledge and services. She aspires to motivate and teach so that her employees receive that same experience she gained at her first hair salon job. O’Strander says she focuses strongly on growth.

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Tammy O’s stylists and spa specialists.

Working alongside O’Strander at Tammy O’s is Vicki Martin, the massage therapist and shoe shiner. She began working there in 2003. She specializes in therapeutic and deep tissue massaging. Also, Cindi Rains is the nail technician, an employee of over ten years.

Recently, Robin Jones, a friend of O’Strander’s since 1995, joined the team, focusing on cosmetology at the salon. Jones was a licensed barber in Maryland, specializing in hair replacement, where she previously worked. Joining O’Strander’s salon, Jones brings a background of culture and diversity in regards to hair styling, as her passion and talent centers around styling and re-growing hair of people with mixed ethnicities. As a woman of mixed backgrounds herself, Jones sees “this business [as] artistry.” She plans to incorporate more diversity in the salon’s services, hoping to attract more female customers and customers with diverse backgrounds.

Dedicated workers at Tammy O's gather at the spa.

Dedicated workers at Tammy O’s gather at the spa.

For O’Strander and her co-workers, a significant part of their success is due to their location. They are a part of downtown city life; the Shoppes at Akron Centre is located in the heart of the city. She describes it as “a perfect place to be.” The city life draws in a lot of excitement and entertainment, and O’Strander mentions that she sees her salon as a part of it all. “I see [customers] on a daily basis because they work in this building or they [frequently visit],” she says, “They’re more like friends than clients.”

Employees in the downtown area, along with shoppers and browsers, see Tammy O’s and are intrigued by its welcoming appearance and many spa services. O’Strander says that her business is always growing because the people who have used her services before continuously return, while regularly new customers visit. This salon is a great place for students at the University of Akron and workers downtown because of the convenience of location and short amount of time it takes to get there.

What used to be a barber shop transformed into a full-package “head-to-toe” service salon and spa. O’Strander puts her passion and skills into her business, offering expert hair and other services, as well as a friendly, inviting environment where the workers know each customer by name. In 2010 and 2011, Tammy O’s was named the Akron Beacon Journal’s Best Barber and in both those years and in 2012, named Beacon’s Best Spa and Salon. Tammy O’s is a great place to get pampered or a haircut—they provide care and talent that is hard to find elsewhere.

For more information about Tammy O’s Hair Salon, visit their web page on our site, give them a call at 330-253-2300, or stop in at 50 S Main St, Suite 111. When visiting the salon, remember that Tammy O’s has a Do Downtown card member promotion of 10% off any service.

By Spencer Skolnick, Downtown Akron Partnership Intern

Distinctly Downtown: Natalie’s

Natalies logoIf you are familiar with The Dessert Bar, then you know Natalie’s will be an experience you won’t forget. The location of the pleasant eatery might have changed, but the delicious recipes have expanded and they offer new menu items including breakfast, lunch and dinner items. Now located in the Shoppes at Akron Centre, Natalie’s is open and ready to connect and share their new vision with Downtown Akron. Whether you are in the mood for an appetizing chicken salad or a sweet signature Hollywood square, Natalie’s will meet your needs.

Natalie, who co owns the restaurant along with her husband, started cooking in her younger years. She attended a culinary arts trade program during high school which fueled the fire in her heart for cooking and baking. Although Natalie loved the restaurant business and working in the environment, being young and in school made that difficult. She then entered the corporate world and worked there for about 15 years. With the passion for the kitchen still residing inside of her, five years into her corporate America career, she started baking cakes. Baking cakes and catering soon became the focus of her drive. Natalie left corporate America and decided to open a business to what many would remember as The Dessert Bar.
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Natalie switched locations from the Montrose area to right here in the heart of Downtown Akron. She has expressed her love for the city and for the history and security of the Chase building. After asking Natalie what she looked forward to the most, she replied “the increased traffic flow”. Now that she is more out in the open and not as hidden as before in her previous location, she anticipates serving existing formal customers and meeting new patrons to make them customers for life. While working in a friendly family environment, she hopes that new and existing patrons notice the name and menu change. The name change from The Dessert Bar to Natalie’s was designed to give insight to the larger spectrum of food Natalie and her restaurant could offer other than just desserts. Natalie’s offers breakfast, on request only, home-style dishes, standard deli options, specialty items and grill items. All menu items are made with homemade recipes, and are accompanied by homemade sides. Catering is also available upon request. Natalie’s catering events range from corporate lunches, and weddings, to anniversaries and school reunions. Natalie enjoys being in Akron and serving her community. Along with anticipating meeting new customers, a smooth transition from the familiar Dessert Bar to the current Natalie’s, is the main goal for this restaurant owner.

To experience the warm and friendly environment that Natalie strives to offer her customers, visit her new location in Downtown Akron 50 S, Main St., Suite 122. To inquire about her catering or to make a delivery request contact Natalie’s at (234) 334-4166. From about 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. Natalie’s receives a rush of patrons for lunch, so when visit, plan accordingly.

To find out more information about the menu, catering information or to see examples of Natalie’s exceptional cakes and desserts, visit her website at www.nataliesakron.com or visit their Facebook page at www.facebook/TheDessertBarAkron.

By: Chantel Burt
DAP intern

Distinctly Downtown: Urban Eats

058Urban Eats is a pop-art cafe owned by Elizabeth Tyran and Jason Scala, two creative geniuses, who turned their former order counter into a visual, compelling & fun place to eat! Jason and Liz both have a passion for food as well as art. Whether it’s local art, or a masterpiece from home, they acknowledge the beauty in each piece and showcase them in the restaurant. Liz is an UA alumnae while Jason has mastered the art of culinary. When you put their two minds together and you witness the talent this power couple posses, the outcomes are unlimited. They both strive to provide healthy and hearty meals to the people they appreciate most, the people in their community.

Urban Eats is the center of a live, 053 work and play environment. The owners of this cafe appreciate all the walks of life they encounter and the relationships they build while residing in the this community. Since their work and personal home live here; they especially know the importance of community and supporting one another. Liz says, although the occupants of the neighborhood may change over time, the community and the city constantly grows. Outside of their cafe, they support local artist in attending art shows and hosting a children’s “artwalk”.

Along with the fascinating and eye catching wall art, their food is definitely something worth discussing. Referring to the menu, Liz says “they have something for everyone”. What’s so unique and diverse about Urban Eats is the fact that they change their menu each month. Sometimes it’s a new and captivating item or it could be a familiar favorite that you love and crave. In order to balance the variety of meals they offer they have to work together. Liz considered herself the “dreamer’ and referred to Jason as the “doer”. She thinks and creates these thoughtful and balanced recipes while Jason creates magic in the kitchen to bring her ideas to life. They listen and accommodate to their customers to make sure every trip is special.

Creative, exceptional and inspiring are just a few words to describe their establishment. working alongside Musica, which is now open during the week, Urban Eats tries to integrate and encourage originality and creativity. With help051 from their small but mighty staff, Max, who is also multi-talented and artsy, they are able to achieve the motto of live, work and play. Whether you are vising for lunch during the rush, or stopping in after an event at Musica, Urban Eats is a place where art meets food and community is welcomed. You will quickly be inspired by Liz and Jason’s refreshing personalities, their fine food and the original atmosphere, they cherish. Urban Eats is located on East Market and they are open 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. Monday thru Friday and during any Musica events. You can always call ahead to order and delivery within downtown is available with a $25 minimum. Catering is also available for businesses and organizations upon request. Visit their website at www.urbaneatsmusica.com.

By: Chantel Burt
DAP intern

Distinctly Downtown: Crafty Mart

Crafty Mart logoThe sixth annual Crafty Mart returns to the Rubber City on Saturday November 29 and Sunday, November 30, 2014.  Not only will the annual non-traditional holiday arts and crafts show take place over two days but it is stretching to include three separate locations in the downtown area. With over a hundred talented artists and makers selling a variety of unique handmade items, this is the perfect place to find distinctive gifts for everyone on your list.  Admission is free and the event runs from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on both days at all three locations.

Crafty Mart takes place at Musica (51 E Market St), the Akron Art Museum (1 S High St) and Summit Artspace (140 E Market St). The expansion is a coordinated effort by three community-minded venues to offer Akron residents the best opportunity to discover, meet, and purchase from some of the area’s best fine artists, artisans, and crafters.

Once again, Crafty Mart coincides with Small Business Saturday (November 29, 2014), a craftymart6thannualconsumer movement that encourages holiday shopping from small local businesses.  It is Crafty Mart’s intention to not only support local artists by giving them an opportunity to vend their wares but also to provide an exciting event for local residents to shop from small-business individuals.

The sixth annual Crafty Mart will also expand to include free workshop opportunities for members of the community to sign up and take classes from skilled artists. Crafty Mart’s workshops were first introduced during the outdoor Summer Faire 2014, July 5th Crafty Mart, and the new workshops scheduled during November 29 and 30 are expected to fill up quickly.  More information on the workshops is available at http://www.craftymart.com/#workshops

Food and coffee will be for sale during the event and deejays from The Mighty Soul Night will be spinning our favorite soul tunes at all three venues. Parking is free on the street, the Library Parking Deck on the SW Corner of High & Market Streets, and the flat lot on Summit Street across from Summit Artspace.

Crafty Mart was first established in 2009 as a haven of uncommon, quality-made, local arts and crafts. In 2013, Crafty Mart was voted one of the “Best of the City” by Akron Life Magazine. For more information on Crafty Mart’s past and present, go to: www.craftymart.com.